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pix Outgrowing Your Music And Band pix
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pix pix by Tim Sweeney  

Page added in December, 2015

About The Author

Author Tim Sweeney is head of Tim Sweeney & Associates, who are entering their 18th year of being, "the only true artist development company in the world."

Tim is one of the music industry's most sought after experts and consultants, and has written several influential books including "Tim Sweeney's Guide To Releasing Independent Records".

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Send comments or questions to Tim Sweeney.

© Tim Sweeney

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  One of the most difficult subjects for artists to discuss with me at the Music Strategies Conference (www.MusicStrategies.com) was the realization by some that they have or are outgrowing their band members, the people they are working with them and even their music.

So lets talk about some of the signs that may show you are outgrowing your band members or the people working with you.
  • You are the only one booking and promoting your shows.
  • You are the only one contacting the radio, press or record stores trying to get airplay, reviews or generate sales for your music.
  • When the basics of the group become a problem. i.e. Setting up band practice or having everyone show up on time. Even when they do, band practice becomes a “bitch and moan session” about what everyone is not doing.
So if those are some signs that you are outgrowing the people working with you and your band members, what do I mean by outgrowing your music?

Every artist goes through a continuing evolving process of who they are as a person and as an artist. The everyday elements of life shape who they are and their importance to us individually. Too often artists create CDs that within a short period of time (in their view) no longer represent who they are and what their music is about. They will be constantly changing which songs to play at shows stating some are too old or they are tired of performing them.

While evolving and developing as an artist are incredibly important, it is vital that you show your audience and the people around you, your growth process. If you find that you are not as interested in performing the same songs or with the same people, don’t resist it saying I have to stay with these songs because my fans love them or with the same band members because they got you to your current level. Just accept that your inner drive will push you to create the music you want and need to.

It is far better to come to the realization early on that like the elements of your life that are always in constant change, the people working with you, your band members and your music will be as well.

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